Reverse Lunge with Twist

Targets: butt, thighs, core, shoulders, and upper back
Stand with your arms extended forward at chest height, holding one end of the band in each hand. Step your left foot back, and lower into a lunge. Twist your torso over your right leg, and pull your hands farther apart, stretching the band. Return to start, then repeat on the opposite side. Alternate sides with each rep.

Make it easier: Grab the band near its ends for less resistance.

Reverse Lunge with Twist

Targets: butt, thighs, core, shoulders, and upper back

Stand with your arms extended forward at chest height, holding one end of the band in each hand. Step your left foot back, and lower into a lunge. Twist your torso over your right leg, and pull your hands farther apart, stretching the band. Return to start, then repeat on the opposite side. Alternate sides with each rep.

Make it easier: Grab the band near its ends for less resistance.

(Source: womenshealthmag.com)

Posted on August 20 with 12 notes at 5:00 pm
finding-my-inner-alpha:

Yes please. This is what I want

Photoshop? You can download a free trial here. 

finding-my-inner-alpha:

Yes please. This is what I want

Photoshop? You can download a free trial here

image

Posted on August 20 with 49 notes at 3:59 pm

wasiawasia:

Just let me be.
Your willingness to want to change my thought pattern is alarming.

Let me be.
I like it here.

Shanti 🙏

Posted on August 20 with 249 notes at 3:38 pm

brokntrust:

the-exercist:

brokntrust:

the-exercist
please view this

Is there something in particular that you’d like me to comment on? Considering that a good portion of the gallery only contains one photo, are two different people, or were taken on the same day with different poses, this source isn’t being serious about the “Before and After” thing. It’s just click bait that gives people an excuse to stare at women’s asses.

Yes. The fact that optical illusions are being used for fitspo. Thanks.

Gladly!

You ever notice how these sort of Before & After/Squats & No-Squats montages don’t exist for men? How men aren’t encouraged to post selfies of their asses in cut-off shorts and tight underwear? How there’s no male equivalent of Jen Selter on Instagram?

It’s because this stuff isn’t actually about fitness. It’s not about the way that exercise affects your body, or how your health can improve through weight lifting. Instead, it’s about using the same tired ol’ soft porn techniques and then advertising them in a more socially acceptable manner. It’s not okay to look at porn while you’re at work, but you can label those exact same pictures as “Motivation” or “Fitspo” and suddenly the context is rewritten - You’re not exploiting these women, you’re admiring them! They’re not posing for your gratification, they’re challenging you to improve yourself!

That’s why so many of these Before & After photos are false - Websites are using the Before-After rhetoric as a way of bringing in a larger audience. The point there is for the women to appeal to you aesthetically, not for them to actually display improved health. The model’s fitness level is irrelevant. (Based only on someone’s appearance, you don’t actually know if they’re healthier, stronger, have better endurance, or happier with their body. All you know is what they look like.) One single photo isn’t enough information to convey their state of fitness, no matter how many muscles you can see. 

So many of these photos use trick lighting, posing techniques, accessorizing, stereotypes (such as fat = unhappy and fit = pretty), and hair/make-up changes to make the body in one photo appear healthier and more in-shape than the other. These techniques are really easily mimicked on an amateur level (even by people who don’t realize they’re doing it), and they can be used to a truly incredible level once professional photographers and image editors join the party. Photoshop is one way to make your After photo look good, but not all tricks are that blatant.

This stuff is still catering to the male gaze, all while using the language of female strength and empowerment to justify it. And what’s worse, it feeds into the idea that women need to engage in a very specific lifestyle and aesthetic in order to their bodies to have value. It teaches us that if you don’t squat, you’re ugly and no one will find you sexy. But then, if you squat and don’t manage to achieve the magical results that these pictures women supposedly did? Well then, you’re a failure and you did something wrong, even if you can now squat 100lb more than before. This is a lose-lose situation. 

So always make sure that you look at “inspirational” photos like this critically. Don’t take them at face value. If you think that one of those women is pretty and sexy? Hooray, good for her! (And for you!) It’s more than okay to be attracted to someone or to want a body like her’s. But recognize that there is never any one action that is responsible for such a big change. Squats are not a magical exercise that make or break a woman’s shape, nor is a woman who squats going to be inherently “better” or sexier than someone who doesn’t. 

As a culture, we’re now starting to learn that magazines and advertisements can lie to us through the use of photoshop and professional styling. Now it’s time for us to accept that even amateur photography can do the same. 

Posted on August 20 with 730 notes at 2:05 pm

brokntrust:

the-exercist
please view this

Is there something in particular that you’d like me to comment on? Considering that a good portion of the gallery only contains one photo, are two different people, or were taken on the same day with different poses, this source isn’t being serious about the “Before and After” thing. It’s just click bait that gives people an excuse to stare at women’s asses.

Posted on August 20 with 730 notes at 1:06 pm
What was a policeman, if not a civilian with a uniform and a badge? But they tended to use the term [civilian] these days as a way of describing people who were not policemen. It was a dangerous habit: once policemen stopped being civilians, the only other thing they could be was soldiers.
-"Snuff" by Terry Pratchett (via knerdy)
Posted on August 19 with 1,096 notes at 7:58 pm
Dumbbell Floor Press

Lie faceup on the floor holding a pair of dumbbells above your shoulders, arms straight (A). Lower the weights until your upper arms touch the floor(B). Press them up to the starting position.

Dumbbell Floor Press

Lie faceup on the floor holding a pair of dumbbells above your shoulders, arms straight (A). Lower the weights until your upper arms touch the floor(B). Press them up to the starting position.

(Source: womenshealthmag.com)

Posted on August 19 with 23 notes at 7:00 pm
Triceps Extension

How to do it: Come into a lunge position, with your back heel on the ground. Lean over your front bent knee as your lift your arm straight up by your side, top of the weight facing the ceiling. Lift and lower the weight about an inch

Triceps Extension

How to do it: Come into a lunge position, with your back heel on the ground. Lean over your front bent knee as your lift your arm straight up by your side, top of the weight facing the ceiling. Lift and lower the weight about an inch

(Source: shape.com)

Posted on August 19 with 21 notes at 5:00 pm

femme-in-floral:

fullten:

fullten:

I wanted to make I post I could link too whenever someone asks me this~

Seriously. Even if I was hella in shape, really healthy, no one would be asking for health or work out tips from me if I was fat. Stop assuming because someone looks like what society deems as ‘healthy’ or ‘fit’ that they are, it’s a lie, they are try to sell you things and make you hate and judge strangers. Stop buying into it. 

Something to add, 

even medical professionals cannot judge people by their looks, which is why mri machines, and x-ray machines, are a fucking thing, but lazy doctors and lazy people will resort to ‘You just need to lose some weight,’ as any advice to any aliment a fat person may have, which is bullshit since being fat isn’t always the deciding factor in health. 

and to be frank, more people are gonna get this message cause it was said by a thin person, if a fat person wrote this it would just be reblogged with fat jokes, claiming op is making excuses, and faux concerns about health and claims of ‘glorifying obesity,’ And all those people who disagree with the message, ask yourself why. You are basically a successful, obnoxiously complacent product of a massive brain washing, being perfectly groomed in hating others who don’t look like what you’ve been told is proper and human and you have been taught that pretend empathy and backhanded concern is better then a real genuine understanding. 

Which I suggest you fix.

Thinness does not equal health or beauty, and the belief that it does has cost a lot of fucking lives. 

I was looking through the notes on this and someone reblogged it with the comment “I agree, but but being fat *is* unhealthy!” Did they actually read any of this at all?

Kettlebell Crunch


Set Up: Lie on your back with a kettlebell behind your head on the floor. Extend your legs and arms, and grab the kettlebell by the horns with a neutral grip (palms facing each other).Action: Contract your core to bring your knees, chest, shoulders and head up off the floor, bringing the kettlebell to meet your knees in the middle of your body. Very slowly lower back down and repeat.

Kettlebell Crunch

Set Up: Lie on your back with a kettlebell behind your head on the floor. Extend your legs and arms, and grab the kettlebell by the horns with a neutral grip (palms facing each other).
Action: Contract your core to bring your knees, chest, shoulders and head up off the floor, bringing the kettlebell to meet your knees in the middle of your body. Very slowly lower back down and repeat.

(Source: strongfitnessmag.com)

Posted on August 18 with 77 notes at 7:01 pm
Dumbbell Upright Rows
Grasp a dumbbell in each hand with a pronated (palms forward) grip that is slightly less than shoulder width. The dumbbells should be resting on top of your thighs. Your arms should be extended with a slight bend at the elbows and your back should be straight. This will be your starting position.
Use your side shoulders to lift the dumbbells as you exhale. The dumbbells should be close to the body as you move it up and the elbows should drive the motion. Continue to lift them until they nearly touch your chin. Tip: Your elbows should drive the motion. As you lift the dumbbells, your elbows should always be higher than your forearms. Also, keep your torso stationary and pause for a second at the top of the movement.
Lower the dumbbells back down slowly to the starting position. Inhale as you perform this portion of the movement.
Repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.

Caution: Be very careful with how much weight you use in this exercise. Too much weight leads to bad form, which in turn can cause shoulder injury. I’ve seen this too many times so please no jerking, swinging and cheating. Also, if you suffer from shoulder problems, you may want to stay away from upright rows and substitute by some form of lateral raises.

Variations: This exercise can also be performed using a straight bar attached to a low pulley and it can also be performed using an e-z bar.

Dumbbell Upright Rows

  1. Grasp a dumbbell in each hand with a pronated (palms forward) grip that is slightly less than shoulder width. The dumbbells should be resting on top of your thighs. Your arms should be extended with a slight bend at the elbows and your back should be straight. This will be your starting position.
  2. Use your side shoulders to lift the dumbbells as you exhale. The dumbbells should be close to the body as you move it up and the elbows should drive the motion. Continue to lift them until they nearly touch your chin. Tip: Your elbows should drive the motion. As you lift the dumbbells, your elbows should always be higher than your forearms. Also, keep your torso stationary and pause for a second at the top of the movement.
  3. Lower the dumbbells back down slowly to the starting position. Inhale as you perform this portion of the movement.
  4. Repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.

Caution: Be very careful with how much weight you use in this exercise. Too much weight leads to bad form, which in turn can cause shoulder injury. I’ve seen this too many times so please no jerking, swinging and cheating. Also, if you suffer from shoulder problems, you may want to stay away from upright rows and substitute by some form of lateral raises.

Variations: This exercise can also be performed using a straight bar attached to a low pulley and it can also be performed using an e-z bar.

(Source: bodybuilding.com)

Posted on August 18 with 27 notes at 5:00 pm
afittylife:

https://www.facebook.com/Fitness.For.Girls

BMI charts like this are ridiculously outdated.
That’s what this is - BMI. It’s misleading and doesn’t take a person’s overall muscle mass or body fat percentage into consideration. This chart makes absolutely no distinction between weight gained from fat stores and weight gained from lean tissue - It literally does not comment on your health, nor was it ever intended to. Instead, it lumps everyone of a certain height together into one group, regardless of their activity levels, genetics, body composition, medical history, frame size and age.
Your height is not the sole determinant of how much you can weigh while being healthy. It is one variant among many. To say that height and weight are so strongly linked is to ignore every other aspect of your health and physiology. 
There is nothing inherently good about being 5’7” tall and 123-164 pounds. Targeting that weight is rather arbitrary for most of us. For some people, that will be far too thin and for others it will be far too fat. The healthiness of our body composition is going to depend on whether or not we are actually healthy at that weight. If you are 5’7” and 210 pounds, but you are suffering from no issues with blood pressure, cholesterol, insomnia, blood sugar levels, etc, then that weight is fine for you. It can even be your personal Target weight. Problems only occur once you start to develop medical trouble that directly stems from your weight. And even in that case, considering that “good health” will look and feel different for everyone, it does not mean that your weight is something that has to change. 
Please stop promoting the concept that there is a universal ideal weight for everyone. Our bodies are not the same and they will not always function in the same way. Trying to force the same standard onto everyone is just a way of ignoring an individual’s personal health. 

afittylife:

https://www.facebook.com/Fitness.For.Girls

BMI charts like this are ridiculously outdated.

That’s what this is - BMI. It’s misleading and doesn’t take a person’s overall muscle mass or body fat percentage into consideration. This chart makes absolutely no distinction between weight gained from fat stores and weight gained from lean tissue - It literally does not comment on your health, nor was it ever intended to. Instead, it lumps everyone of a certain height together into one group, regardless of their activity levels, genetics, body composition, medical history, frame size and age.

Your height is not the sole determinant of how much you can weigh while being healthy. It is one variant among many. To say that height and weight are so strongly linked is to ignore every other aspect of your health and physiology. 

There is nothing inherently good about being 5’7” tall and 123-164 pounds. Targeting that weight is rather arbitrary for most of us. For some people, that will be far too thin and for others it will be far too fat. The healthiness of our body composition is going to depend on whether or not we are actually healthy at that weight. If you are 5’7” and 210 pounds, but you are suffering from no issues with blood pressure, cholesterol, insomnia, blood sugar levels, etc, then that weight is fine for you. It can even be your personal Target weight. Problems only occur once you start to develop medical trouble that directly stems from your weight. And even in that case, considering that “good health” will look and feel different for everyone, it does not mean that your weight is something that has to change. 

Please stop promoting the concept that there is a universal ideal weight for everyone. Our bodies are not the same and they will not always function in the same way. Trying to force the same standard onto everyone is just a way of ignoring an individual’s personal health. 

Posted on August 18 with 185 notes at 2:22 pm
Squat Big Without Hurting Your Back:

Squat depth is a touchy subject. On one hand, it’s hipper than ever to hate on lifters for doing too-heavy quarter-depth squats. But on the other hand, if that lifter decides to drop a few plates and go to full depth, he’ll get even more criticism to go along with his DOMS.
Tell me if you’ve ever had this shouted at you: “Go lower. Lower. Whoa—butt wink!”
What is commonly known as “butt wink” refers to the moment at the bottom of a squat when the pelvis begins to rotate backward and slip under the body. You’ll also hear it referred to as “posterior pelvic tilt” or just “pelvic tilt,” and when it’s severe, it can be bad news for your lower back.
You can see people do everything they can to avoid butt wink. They start their squat with crazy overarched backs, most commonly. Or they pull out of a perfectly good squat at the slightest sign of pelvic tilt, beat themselves up about it, and try every obscure assistance exercise that’s ever been mentioned in a forum post.

It’s time to set the record straight. Yes, it’s important to achieve good levels of flexibility and joint integrity, particularly if you’re moving heavy weights in a complex movement like the back squat. But, just like passing the knees over the toes, pelvic tilt has gotten blown way out of proportion. It’s a question of degrees and personal build—and sometimes, the exact things you do to avoid it can make it worse.
Read More Here

Squat Big Without Hurting Your Back:

Squat depth is a touchy subject. On one hand, it’s hipper than ever to hate on lifters for doing too-heavy quarter-depth squats. But on the other hand, if that lifter decides to drop a few plates and go to full depth, he’ll get even more criticism to go along with his DOMS.

Tell me if you’ve ever had this shouted at you: “Go lower. Lower. Whoa—butt wink!”

What is commonly known as “butt wink” refers to the moment at the bottom of a squat when the pelvis begins to rotate backward and slip under the body. You’ll also hear it referred to as “posterior pelvic tilt” or just “pelvic tilt,” and when it’s severe, it can be bad news for your lower back.

You can see people do everything they can to avoid butt wink. They start their squat with crazy overarched backs, most commonly. Or they pull out of a perfectly good squat at the slightest sign of pelvic tilt, beat themselves up about it, and try every obscure assistance exercise that’s ever been mentioned in a forum post.

It’s time to set the record straight. Yes, it’s important to achieve good levels of flexibility and joint integrity, particularly if you’re moving heavy weights in a complex movement like the back squat. But, just like passing the knees over the toes, pelvic tilt has gotten blown way out of proportion. It’s a question of degrees and personal build—and sometimes, the exact things you do to avoid it can make it worse.

Read More Here

Posted on August 18 with 66 notes at 1:51 pm
cactusorgy
That dude was being an asshole but you could have handled it better

You may have to be more specific, I speak with a lot of assholes. 

Posted on August 18 with 29 notes at 1:24 pm

catsneezesandpizza:

Okay, feminists. Two can play at that game.
“LOL women tears.”
“Misogyny doesn’t exist.”
“Misogyny is just us joking around.”
“#KillAllWomen”
“Misandry is ingrained into our culture.”
“You’re just a feminist because you don’t understand what antifeminism or egalitarianism is.”

You’re right, two can absolutely play that game.

But one side is taking advantage of their position in power and using it to violently demean the disenfranchised, using ~rhetoric~ as an excuse to uphold a bigoted status quo that’s incredibly familiar and institutionally accepted in our society.

Meanwhile, the other side is reacting to their poor treatment throughout history and simultaneously attempting to establish themselves as valid, worthwhile people worthy of respect & basic rights while recognizing that they do not have enough institutional power to subjugate or systematically devalue their oppressors (beyond some hurt feelings here and there).

But you’re right, yeah. It’s totally the same game.

All the rules just happen to be slanted in your favor. 

Posted on August 18 with 97 notes at 1:18 pm